Thursday, October 1, 2009

Some Aging Beauties for Blooming Friday

Katarina, of Roses and Stuff talked about aging, and how different blooms handle it. She invited us to show blooms we think age gracefully or other blooms we'd like to share. First, I want to share the lovely iris blooming away at a time most iris have long finished for the season. Sweet Bay helped me figure out this is 'Harvest of Memories' iris. I got several unnamed irises last fall, for 75% off at a local garden center, and didn't know much about them. Such a fun surprise! The cleome on the right are aging quite gracefully, and holding their seed pods out so proudly.



Some of my blooms have aged into nice looking seed heads. This is from the new blue clematis that is not a climber.



The rattlesnake master is a wildflower I forgot to include in last week's post. A cardinal climber vine has made itself at home on it.



Here is a seed head close up. I like the texture of it.



Here's a zinnia that is almost finished with its job producing seeds.


Liatris and black-eyed Susans next to still blooming coreopsis:



False Baptisia seed pods:



The Virginia mountain mints are some of the most graceful agers I know of.


19 comments:

  1. I think they are aging very beautifully. Amazing how much better some plants age than others, isn't it?

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  2. Hi Sue~~ Do you have a Latin name for the rattlesnake master? Just curious. I love the foliage. Not that I have room to grow it, mind you....

    Your iris is fabulous, blooming away in October. Who'd a thunk?

    I think the Agastaches are a graceful bunch--eventually losing their color, but keeping their form.

    Probably one of the worst offenders in the dying gracefully category would have to be garden Phlox [P. paniculata]. It will have pretty blooms among the cluster of sagging, brown petals. Ick. But do you think I'd stop growing it? No way. I bet you're the same way. Some plants just deserve our reverence, despite their foibles.

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  3. What a beautiful iris - I´m impressed!
    Have a great weekend.
    Randi

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  4. So aging can be beautiful. At least at your blog! Have a nice week end!

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  5. Remember you showing your Virginia mountain mints earlier this summer, it is as beautiful now in Aurumn as well..

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  6. Wonderful aging beauties.

    FlowerLady

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  7. I love zinnias...great photos

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  8. What a beautiful yellow in your iris Sue! Wonderful to be blooming now! From the looks of it you must have birds enjoying all those seeds you let stand. Carol

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  9. Great photos of aging plants. The Virginia mountain mints is truely a beautiful ager.

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  10. I love how plants slowly change appearances, yet remain so interesting. Could there be a lesson there?

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  11. A lot og beautiful aging plants.
    The virginia mountain mint was new to me, and I find it very interesting. Is it an eatable plant and does it have fragrans?

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  12. There is beauty in every stage!!

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  13. Ah, the mountain mint is indeed attractive as it ages! Lovely! Seed heads and seedpods can be very pretty.
    Have a nice weekend!

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  14. What a beautiful clump of iris in bloom! Mine didn't rebloom this year so I'll just have to gaze longingly at yours. :)

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  15. Yes, I suppose some do age a bit more gracefully, especially Sedum Autumn Joy looking good all winter. I knew you'd like my bug pix, as you often take them too.

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  16. Oh my--so beautiful--I would to have a cup of coffee and just stroll around your garden.

    Sue

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  17. You have some plants that really do age gracefully! I love the clematis, rattlesnake master and Va mountain mint seedheads. Such gorgeous iris blooms~ thanks for sharing:)

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  18. Hi - I love your Nebraska garden -We are sort of neighbors!

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