Monday, October 12, 2009

The Aftermath (pics taken yesterday)

Finished for the season:

Black-eyed Susan Vine



Zinnias





Cleomes




Dahlias, Cosmos, etc. in pots



Dahlias in the ground




The Cosmos that just started blooming:



Some plants that seem to have survived so far:

Well, I'm not sure about the iris, but the color is still nice.



Snapdragons are pretty cold hardy, and these look like they still want to bloom.



Strawflower



Verbena Bonariensis



'Fireworks' goldenrod



Skullcap



The sweet allyssums have been blooming ever since being planted,
and the snow hasn't seemed to have phased them.



Stock



These are pansies that have been in the tub since March.



Debonair Chrysanthemum



I forgot the name of this petunia, but it looks like it has survived so far.



The salvia planted from a dried stem placed there last fall:



This dianthus has spent the last several winters in the egress window. We haven't put pots in there yet, because we are hoping the weather will warm up. It is supposed to in a few days, so we'll hang in there, and let my knee and ankle heal more before tucking the plants in.


In my last post, I started out with flower buds, and led some to believe I was going to show opened flowers. Some were shocked over the snow. I was, too. It was quite early. Yesterday, when I got home from church, as I pulled into the driveway, I glanced across the street. I was not prepared to see all the dead plants, and tears filled my eyes.

This week we are warming up from the lows in the 20s and 30s, with highs in the 40s. By Friday, it is supposed to get into the 50s, and by the weekend, the 60s. That is what the normal weather is like this time of year. I hope it sticks around awhile. We have lots of cleaning up to do. I take most of the annuals out in the fall, and clean up the perennials in the spring.

I hope you are enjoying fall, whatever your weather is like.


25 comments:

  1. Oh my! I cannot imagine snow this early! I was out working in the garden most of the day until the rain moved in.

    I'm sorry that you lost so many of your beautiful blooms so soon.

    Cameron

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  2. Looks as if you have some sturdy characters there, some of them. They got a taste of snow, but the temps were not so low as to take them out. Winter needs to come a few chills at a time.

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  3. I'm sorry you lost those plants to the early cold. You still have a lot of beautiful flowers though. I love that skullcap.

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  4. That must have been a dreadful shock Sue! I am sorry that you lost all your gorgeous blooms...It seems so early? But that is after spending 30+ years in the south...I've forgotten the Midwestern weather. I am so glad you have plants that tolerate frost! Yippee for them. gail

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  5. Sue, I would cry, for sure. The good thing is there are some survivors! I was surprised to see a petunia among them!

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  6. Sigh sigh sigh!!
    but am glad you still have the brave ones holding out.

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  7. Hi Sue, I'm thinking it's about to close up shop. At least you heard a forecast for better weather. We didn't receive the snow, but we've had cold, icky weather. I'm waiting for our "Indian Summer!" ;-)

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  8. Petunia is a very hardy plant for me. I am always amazed to see them survive in the heat, here.

    It is a shame that you lost so many beautiful blossoms so early. I hate to see our winter come, and we have really mild winters, as a rule. Do you cut the perennials back now, or wait for spring to cut them? It is so hard for me to do, but I leave them until spring. My garden looks terrible, but it is so much better for the plant. Better they look bad for awhile than be dead.

    Do you do any winter sowing?

    I love that 'Fireworks' goldenrod! Does it grow from seed, or cutting? The verbena bonariensis grows wild here, but I have been tempted to purchase seeds for my garden. I am afraid tho, as they would surely plant themselves everywhere.

    I enjoyed the visit!

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  9. You are living what I have been fearing. We have a had a very long season for us and I have worried that to many of my plants would still be up and out when the frosts started. Of course I might have a heart attack if it snowed this early in Washington State.
    I am glad that you have some flowers that seemed to have survived the chilly offense. The iris don't look to happy but the others look just fine.

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  10. So glad to see that some of your plants survived the snow!

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  11. Hello Susan,

    What great examples of frost sensitive plants and those that appear to thrive. I have heard of the cold weather that has hit your area, yet you still have beautiful plants that are blooming - how great is that?

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  12. Good Grief...I don't know about snow, but the frost kills the blooms on petunias, alyssum, snapdragons, pansies...but not the plants...I hope your little warm up brings a few more blooms for you to enjoy before the winter settles in..

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  13. Sue, it's been cold and snowy here, too. That probably doesn't make you feel better. Maybe because I'm older, but it doesn't bother me when the killing frost arrives. On to the next thing, the next chapter. When I was younger I ran around covering plants to keep them going. I've not posted for a while nor read blogs and I've missed yours a lot.

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  14. interesting photography now when the winter comes, do you force bulbs and do greeneery indoors?

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  15. Oh ick! I hate snow! I'm sorry that your garden had to suffer already. I've had snapdragons blooming since March, so I'm sure yours will keep on going.

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  16. Whew, I'm glad our snow won't be for a long time if at all! Although it does give you the chance to get everything spruced up now without worrying about taking out plants that may have time left!

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  17. It is so hard to let the garden season come to an end. You still have some beautiful plants.

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  18. We are just waiting for our first frost to wither all our plants. I know it is going to happen any day now. Thanks for the hint on the salvia. I think I will try poking a piece in the ground in a sheltered part of the garden, and see if it will take.

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  19. Sue,
    You still have a lot blooming! Hooray for the survivors! Snaps are one of the best for that.
    You have a big clean up. Is your knee/ankle going to let you get it done? Hope you are well!
    Rosey

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  20. Your poor flowers. Luckily it seems like more survived than didn't. Hope the snow stays away for awhile now!

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  21. What a wonderful garden you have! No snow here yet!

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  22. if your readers are looking for more information on USDA plant hardiness zones, there is a detailed, interactive USDA plant hardiness zone map at http://www.plantmaps.com/usda_hardiness_zone_map.php

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  23. That strawflower still looks really good.....as do several of your flowers.
    Prayers, Bo

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  24. been here two weeks ago. Isn't it just so sad to wake up to see your gorgeous gardens ravaged by mother nature? oh I just hate it!
    have a good week in spite of it all!

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  25. Big hugs to ya, I know that was really hard and such a shock. Your heart is in your garden and it's so pretty. I'm sorry. Mine has been asleep for about two weeks now but I was expecting it.

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