Monday, January 30, 2012

Almost a Week Late for Wildflower Wednesday

I didn't get a post done last month for Gail's Wildlflower Wednesday, but planned to for January, so I am going to go ahead and do it, even though I'm late.  I seem to be late for lots of things.

Even though the winter has been very mild this year, that doesn't mean there are any blooms yet.  There are a few hellebore buds, but they are not wildflowers.  It was almost 70 today, so I enjoyed taking foliage and seed photos after work.

I can't think of the scientific name for this native heuchera, but it was quite small when I planted it, and I am pleased with its growth.  I'm thinking the leaves were green in the summer.  


I've shown the wild quinine in almost every WW post.  I had never heard of it before last spring, and I am excited to see how it and the other one I planted grow.


This is helenium hoopseii, which is a native variety of sneezeweed, but in looking to see its range, found out it's not native to Nebraska.  Still, I got it from our arboretum.  It prefers to be moist.  That must be why I planted it near the Culver's root and another plant that likes moisture, too.  It looks happy so far.


The seedheads of the Joe Pye weed look pretty against the blue sky.


The rattlesnake master seedheads also look nice with the blue sky in the background.


The pasque flowers are one of the first spring flowers to come up and bloom.  I forgot to check to see if the ones I planted in the front yard are starting to come up yet.  I am excited to see how well they do.


It sounds like this winter has been mild in a lot of places.  I wonder what affect that will have on the plants and critters in the spring and summer.  I just hope that whatever comes up now, will not be harmed by colder weather that could yet come.  We need more moisture, too.  I suppose I should get some water on the new plants out there.  Some of the spots are bare dirt.  I hope the little roots are OK under there.

19 comments:

  1. Hi Sue, if i don't know you are in the temperate climate, i will say you are in the tropical dry season. The difference is we have very hot and humid surroundings and you feel really awful outside.

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    1. Hi Andrea,
      I am in Nebraska, zone 5b, where the highs this time of year are normally in the 30s.

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  2. Hi,

    I love that it seems to be so easy for you to pick up natives in your area; I often struggle to find true natives here so have to opt for wildlife friendly instead.

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    1. Hi gwirrel,
      While it is getting easier here to find natives, it can also be confusing. Our arboretum, where I get a lot of native plants, also has some that are not. They have a list of plants, and there is a chart that says whether a plant is native, but last summer, one of the guys who works there said the chart is not accurate. Still, I am enjoying learning and finding new ones.

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  3. I wish I had someplace close to go to get natives. I'm stuck with mail-order, which I prefer to avoid if possible.

    This winter concerns me. We've had hardly any snow and temps well above normal. Out west--no snow pack in the mountains will mean lack of water for irrigating crops....and I think you know what that means for food prices this year......

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    1. Hi Sue,
      I hope there become more sources of native plants for you. Yes, the winter has been wacky. I hope we get the snow they say we have a 60% chance of 2 different days next week.

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  4. I've never heard of rattlesnake master, lol! Love the pic of the seed heads, very nice. I haven't ever participated in Wildflower Wednesday, but I was thrilled to see some baby bluebonnets coming up around our tree in the front garden at the weekend.

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    1. Hi Jayne,
      I hadn't heard of rattlesnake master until a few years ago. There are a number of native plants I hadn't heard of until this spring.

      Enjoy your bluebonnets!

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  5. Hi Sue: Did your zone change with the new USDA map? I'm surprised you're not a 6A. Great photos of the dormant plants! They have their own special beauty!

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    1. No, our zone didn't change, but the 5b has been extended farther north. Yes, I think there is beauty in the garden all year.

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  6. Replies
    1. Thanks for thinking of me, Heather, but I do not do the awards.

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  7. I think the heuchera you are thinking of is Heuchera Villosa. I never paid much attention to this when I first started planting heucheras, but some of the new hybrids are actually of this species. They're supposed to be much hardier than the other types. Like your other commenters, I wish we had a place near here than carried more natives. Most of mine have come from seeds or seedlings from other gardeners.

    I'm a little worried, too, what this mild winter will mean for the coming season. I can't believe I'm wishing for snow, but it would be nice to have a little more of the white stuff to cover the gardens.

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    1. Hi Rose, I looked up the Heuchera Villosa, but don't know if it's what I have. I looked in a book I have, and it could be Heuchera richardsonii. I can't tell for sure, but that is more in our area.

      We are supposed to get rain tomorrow, which is to turn to snow late Friday night, continuing into Saturday afternoon. Our part of the state is in the area where 5 to 10 inches is forecast, but they said if there are any changes in the direction of the storm, the shift would likely change the amount of snow each area could get.

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  8. So many goodies already coming up in your garden! Hasn't this mild winter been wonderful?

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  9. Love those seed heads!
    They really add to the winter landscape with their promise of flowers to come.
    Happy Wildflower Wednesday, even if it is a few days late!
    Lea
    Lea's Menagerie

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  10. Such a strange year. But it's nice to see signs of life. Hopefully the rest of the winter will be mild.

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  11. My heuchera is going crazy in this weird winter, not knowing whether to shrivel up or start growing. Weird winter around here too.

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  12. Love the rattlesnake master--my favorite native. Also love pasque flower, even though I don't have any. And who doesn't love any and all Heucheras?! Somehoe I didn't notice before your house is green. I love that shade!

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